Upcoming exhibitions

   
"Dahlia Drawing", 2016, archival ink jet print, 36 x 28”, 38 x 30” framed

"Dahlia Drawing", 2016, archival ink jet print, 36 x 28”, 38 x 30” framed

"Square", 2016, archival inkjet print, 20 x 25" framed

"Square", 2016, archival inkjet print, 20 x 25" framed

"Eclipse", 2015, archival ink jet print, 28 x 22” framed

"Eclipse", 2015, archival ink jet print, 28 x 22” framed

"Green Grass", 2014, archival inkjet print, 36" x 28”

"Green Grass", 2014, archival inkjet print, 36 x 28”, 38 x 30” framed

"Pinkie", 2007, graphite on Mylar, 32 x 21.5” framed

"Pinkie", 2007, graphite on Mylar, 32 x 21.5” framed

"Knot", 2004, archival ink jet print, 30 x 24.5” emulsion mounted on acrylic

"Knot", 2004, archival ink jet print, 30 x 24.5” emulsion mounted on acrylic

About "Ellen Garvens: Strings Attached", January 5 - February 25, 2017

"Ellen Garvens: Strings Attached", January 5 - February 25, 2017

Norman Lundin presents a solo show of work by Ellen Garvens featuring her recent archival inkjet prints and videos along with a small selection of work from her earlier Prothesis series.

In her statement about the work for the show Ellen Garvens writes:
My process begins with an interest in creating images that defy gravity and escape logic. The set-ups I construct are fluid, often shifting or collapsing during a shoot. Elements left from one scene often find their way into the edges and backgrounds of other photographs, embracing the incidental and what is left behind.

All my work maintains a strong interest in drawing. Despite photographing set-ups that occupy small rooms, the thread, string or cords are like drawn lines, the dark cloth like swatches of ink. In my mind, these set-ups are three-dimensional drawings that I complete by photographing them. The videos relate to drawing by recording simple forms or elements moving across a flat plane. Though they look like animations, they are done by much simpler means.

The exhibition also includes photographs made in medical clinics from 2003 to 2010. I photographed devices that were created through a process of manual construction and alteration. These devices had once been useful but were set aside and no longer needed. An interest in drawing is also evident in this series as I isolated the devices against a neutral backdrop and kept the accumulated notations, marks, and gestures that came from their creation and use.

It is important to me that the medical devices are re-oriented and their usefulness unexplained. I relate to the uncertainty and the undefined purpose. It is in the momentary confusion found in both these bodies of work, that a combination of anxiety, a new way of looking, and occasional humor can co-exist.